Home Forums Recipes Looking for fermented dill pickle recipe

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This topic contains 10 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  fermenTed 3 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #1695

    RitaCampbell
    Participant

    I have 6 quarts of organic pickling cucumbers and fresh dill. I am looking for a fermented dill or kosher dill pickle recipe if you care to share it.

    Thanks
    Rita

    #1696

    butterflies
    Participant

    I use:

    1 T of sea salt for every cup of filtered water

    Put cucumbers in glass jars along with a few peeled garlic cloves and lots of dill (heads, not long stems) You can add mustard seeds or sliced onions if you like.

    To help the cucumbers stay crisp add a few fresh oak leaves, cherry leaves or a little Dry black tea. The tannin helps the pickles stay crisp.

    Make sure the pickles stay below the level of the liquid. A well scrubbed stone or a zip-lock bag filled with water will do. The brine should be about 1 inch below the top of the container. I use an airlock but a clean towel will do. You want the carbon dioxide to get out but no dust or bacteria to get in. Put something under the jar to catch any liquid should the brine overflow during fermenting.

    If the container is clear you will be able to see bubbles forming after a day or two. Test after 5 days to see if it is sour enough for your taste. The speed of fermenting will vary depending on the temperature of your room.

    Once tangy enough for you transfer to smaller jars and store in the refrigerator. They will continue to ferment but much more slowly. You can use some of the brine to jump-start your next ferment.

    #1700

    dana
    Participant

    Would also suggest cutting of the blossom end of the cucumber. Helps maintain crispness.

    Dana

    #1701

    RitaCampbell
    Participant

    I cut both ends off and used grape leaves for crispness. I can’t wait to try them! Thanks!

    #1717

    meriah
    Participant

    I use 1 tablespoon salt for half a gallon, and a little veggie ferment starter, usually cauldwells, and a scoop of ecoBloom, and scrub the cucumbers but not cut them. I add hot peppers, either fresh or dried, fresh garlic, sometimes fresh turmeric, lots of dill sprigs or fennel sprigs, and any combo of dried spices like black pepper, pink pepper, coriander, mustard and juniper berries. I’ve been adding carrots also, and don’t know what else to add for the crispness but mine seem to be crisp enough and we eat all before they might get soggie.
    I almost always use the starter culture because it is pretty hot where I live and don’t have a cool place to let them ferment in. Don’t know if I’m using the best reasoning here but don’t want any bad bacteria to get started. I also use an airlock and glass weights. Meriah

    #1723

    kittykitty
    Participant

    Hi, is that amount of salt correct, 1T to a cup of water? All the recipes I find is about 1.5-2 T to a quart of water.

    #1724

    meriah
    Participant

    I use only 1 T for 1/2 gallon. I also use the starter culture. If no culture I’d use 2 Tbs for 1/2 gallon. Some people use more. I like to be able to drink the pickle juice. There are probably some scientific reasons to use more, and temperature considerations. Meriah

    #1725

    meriah
    Participant

    I was curious about the variance in amount of salt, so I found some more information. That salt helps keep the pickles good and crisp longer. The book Ted suggested on this website Fermented Vegtables is a great resource. It suggests 3/4cup salt to 1 gallon of water to make brine for cucumbers. I would imagine you wouldn’t put it all in but just enough to cover the veggies. I usually eat mine fairly quickly and make smaller batches, so I prefer not so much salt. Hope that helps. It’s always good to know the reasons for things. But lots of opinions out there Meriah.

    #1770

    Snowkat
    Participant

    Just another option for something to add to keep the crispiness of the pickles, a couple of bay leaves. Basically any leaf that is safe to eat will add tannins to the brine to help. But I like the flavor of the bay leaf with other spices like pepper corns, mustard seed, coriander seeds, etc.

    #1776

    grid
    Participant

    Hi fellow fermentation fans,

    This method can preserve crispiness without any added extra.

    Happy fermenting :o)
    grid

    #1786

    fermenTed
    Keymaster

    Thank you Butterflies and the rest of you for adding this to our community. I actually hadn’t made and fermented pickles in a couple of years and I’m again inspired to give it a go again. I’ll start this weekend as the Farmer’s Markets are showing up with pickling cukes again!

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